Kay jost 2003

Kay jost 2003

Jost, J. T., & Kay, A. C. (2005). Exposure to Benevolent Sexism and Complementary Gender Stereotypes: Consequences for Specific and Diffuse Forms of System Justification. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 88(3), 498–509. https ... contribute to the stability of unjust and unfair social and political systems (Kay et al., 2009; Jost & Hunyady, 2005). Past work on system justification has shown that people differ in their tendency to hold favorable attitudes toward social, economic, and political systems (Jost & Thompson, 2000; Jost et al., 2010; Kay & Jost, 2003). “econom ically poor” but “psychologically rich” situation (see Kay & Jost, 2003). This work suggests that the perception of an injustice might auto-matically activate a principle or axiom that mitigates that injustice. We seek to expand on this work by investigating other kinds of implicit ideological

We seek to reconcile these seemingly contradictory findings by proposing that victim derogation and victim enhancement are alternate routes to system justification, with the preferred route ... Kay Jost 2003 study 1 sl 74 RESULTS when exposed to the rich character from PSY 326 at University of Toronto We would like to show you a description here but the site won’t allow us.

groups. Similarly, Jost and Kay (2005; Kay & Jost, 2003; Kay, Jost, & Young, 2005) have argued that such comple-mentary stereotypes contribute to system-justifying beliefs that the status quo is fair. That is, stereotypes that depict groups as having both strengths and weaknesses create and reinforce beliefs that the system is just by ... Kay AC, Jost JT. Complementary justice: Effects of “poor but happy” and “poor but honest” stereotype exemplars on system justification and implicit activation of the justice motive. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. 2003; 85:823–837.

March 2003 invasion into Iraq was a mistake, only 17% of republicans think so (Gallup Polling, July, 2005). Republicans are far less likely (49%) than democrats (72%) to view medical research using stem cells from human embryos as morally acceptable (Gallup Polling, May, 2005). And, while 84% of republicans agree with President Bush on the

those beliefs are not threatened (Kay et al., 2007).To achieve this commitment to their beliefs, people often fortify their belief systems by re-construing perceived injustice as equitable through psychological compensatory means. In one study (Kay, Jost, & Young, 2005, study 1), American participants presented with System Justification in Women resulted in disadvantaged groups accepting the status quo of inequality rather than acting to change society for their betterment (Kay et al., 2007). This might explain the demonstrated tendency for out-group favoritism found among low-status group members (Jost & Banaji, 1994). What elicits such justification? Seeking Structure in Social Organization: Compensatory Control and the Psychological Advantages of Hierarchy by Justin P. Friesen A thesis presented to the University of Waterloo (Jost, Glaser, Kruglanski, & Sulloway, 2003; Jost, Pelham, Sheldon, & Sullivan, 2003; Jost & Thompson, 2000). Pratto et al. (1994), for example, have shown that the more individuals were favorable to hierarchical relations and dominant relationships between groups, the more they adhered to a set of ideologies which legitimizes the social hierarchy.

Kay AC, Jost JT (2003) Complementary justice: Effects of" poor but happy" and" poor but honest" stereotype exemplars on system justification and implicit activation of the justice motive. Kay, A. C., & Jost, J. T. (2003). Complementary Justice: Effects of "Poor but Happy" and "Poor but Honest" Stereotype Exemplars on System Justification and Implicit Activation of the Justice Motive.

Kay and Jost (2003) developed a measure to gauge the extent to which individuals embrace or justify the prevailing system. The measure comprises eight items, such as "Most policies serve the greater good" or "Society is set up so that people usually get what they deserve". Alpha internal consistency approximates .80 (Kay & Jost, 2003). Kay AC, Jost JT. Complementary justice: Effects of “poor but happy” and “poor but honest” stereotype exemplars on system justification and implicit activation of the justice motive. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. 2003; 85:823–837.

(adapted from Jost et al., 2007), system justification (Kay & Jost, 2003), perceived uncertainty, and perceived threat to Whites’ societal status (adapted from Outten et al., 2012).4 To assess system threat, we asked participants to indicate their agreement with the idea that the American way of life is threatened (all agreement scales in this tem threat (adapted from Jost et al., 2007), system justi-fication (Kay & Jost, 2003), perceived uncertainty, and perceived threat to Whites’ societal status (adapted from Outten et al., 2012).3 To assess system threat, we asked participants to indicate their agreement with the idea that the American way of life is threatened (all

AU - Kay, Aaron C. AU - Jost, John. PY - 2003/11. Y1 - 2003/11. N2 - It was hypothesized that exposure to complementary representations of the poor as happier and more honest than the rich would lead to increased support for the status quo. students, Kay and Jost (2003) found that exposure to non-complementary stereotypes (e.g., the rich are happier and more honest than the poor) activated justice-related con-cerns. Thus, the failure to perceive advantaged and disadvantaged social groups as possessing “complementary but equal” strengths and weaknesses seems to pose a threat Kay AC, Jost JT (2003) Complementary justice: Effects of" poor but happy" and" poor but honest" stereotype exemplars on system justification and implicit activation of the justice motive.

for people to actively seek to justify the status quo (Jost & Hunyady, 2002). These include epistemic motives to establish order, structure, closure, and certainty as well as existential motives to perceive a safe, reassuring environment (Jost, Fitzsimons, & Kay, 2004; Jost & Hunyady, 2005).

ski, & Sulloway, 2003; Jost & Hunyady, 2005) are related to the desire for a structured, stable, and certain reality. Hence, people justify their social systems, it seems, because it Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada to Aaron C. Kay, Steven J. Spencer, and Mark P. Zanna. We would also like to thank John Jost and Scott Eidelman for their input on earlier drafts of the manuscript. Correspondence concerning this article should be addressed to Aaron C. Kay or Danielle Gaucher, Psychology Department, University ...

Kay a nd Jost (2003), our sca le includes various items re flecting different system justifying be lief systems such as right-wing autho ritarianism, be lief in a just world, fair mar ket ideology,... (Jost, Glaser, Kruglanski, & Sulloway, 2003; Jost, Pelham, Sheldon, & Sullivan, 2003; Jost & Thompson, 2000). Pratto et al. (1994), for example, have shown that the more individuals were favorable to hierarchical relations and dominant relationships between groups, the more they adhered to a set of ideologies which legitimizes the social hierarchy. tification (translated from the English original by Kay and Jost 2003), including items such as “Society is set up so that people usually get what they deserve” and “Most policies serve the greater good”; and (b) economic system justification (translated from Jost and Thompson (adapted from Jost et al., 2007), system justification (Kay & Jost, 2003), perceived uncertainty, and perceived threat to Whites’ societal status (adapted from Outten et al., 2012).4 To assess system threat, we asked participants to indicate their agreement with the idea that the American way of life is threatened (all agreement scales in this John T. Jost is Professor of Psychology and Politics and Co-Director of the Center for Social and Political Behavior at New York University. His research, which addresses stereotyping, prejudice, political ideology, and system justification theory, has been funded by the National Science Foundation and has appeared in top scientific journals and received national and international media attention.